Corporal punishment of children is a violation of their rights to respect for their human dignity and physical integrity. Its widespread legality breaches their right to equal protection under introduction to international and global studies pdf law.

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and other international and regional human rights treaties require states to prohibit corporal punishment of children in all settings of their lives. There is growing progress towards universal prohibition of this most common form of violence against children: 53 states have prohibited all corporal punishment of children, including in the family home. At least 56 more states have expressed a commitment to full prohibition. Click for the full screen interactive map.

Not fully prohibited in any setting. The Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children promotes universal prohibition and elimination of corporal punishment. Supporters of this aim include UNICEF, UNESCO and many international and national organisations and prominent individuals. This website contains detailed individual reports on the legality and prevalence of violent punishment in each state and territory in the world, global and regional tables of progress towards prohibition in all settings, information on the human rights imperative to prohibit all corporal punishment, guidance on achieving prohibition, summaries of research on the issue and more. Click here for a detailed report on the law and corporal punishment in YOUR state.

This is an automatic translation service. Extracts from laws, treaty body recommendations and Universal Periodic Review outcomes are unofficial translations. Despite decades of conflict, death and tragedy, coverage of issues in Africa has often been ignored, oversimplified, or excessively focused on limited aspects. Deeper analysis, background and context has often been lacking, so despite what seems like constant images of starving children in famines, news of billions in aid to Africa from generous donor countries, the background context and analysis is often missing. Whether aid makes the situation worse, or why there is famine and hunger in Africa when African nations are exporting crops to other parts of the world are rarely asked by the mainstream.

Eritrea and the various other civil wars. Source: UNHCR, accessed November 30, 2009If this scale of destruction and fighting was in Europe, then people would be calling it World War III with the entire world rushing to report, provide aid, mediate and otherwise try to diffuse the situation. Israel, each of which were serious conflicts, but in terms of deaths and displaced, were often far less than many conflicts in Africa. 2000 to see what percentage of their media focus fell where. Virgil Hawkins, Conflict Death Tolls, Stealth Conflicts, November 23, 2008More coverage about issues concerning Africa can be found on the Internet than the traditional mainstream media outlets, but even then it is not as easy to find the information. But even Africa, the death toll has little to do with the levels of coverage. 80 times smaller than that in the DRC.

Similarly, political violence in early 2007 in Zimbabwe resulting in one death and a number of arrests and beatings of political leaders became the object of relatively high levels of attention and indignation in the Western media. Virgil Hawkins, What’s death got to do with it? Stealth Conflicts, December 12, 2008But why is it important whether or not media outlets in countries such as those in the West provide coverage of African and other conflicts that do not appear to involve them? Background such as the colonial as well as post-World War II history, social and political context, international economic issues and much more are all perspectives needed to help people in the western nations and elsewhere to really begin to understand the present situations and issues in appropriate context. In international affairs, influential nations, such as many from western countries all have direct and indirect influences around the world, so it is important for such issues to be presented broadly and to see issues such as those in Africa with this context in mind.

Angola, which has seen an estimated 500,000 people killed since 1989 and an estimated 3 million refugees. It is also being torn apart due to resources such as diamonds and offshore oil, with various factions fighting for these prizes, supported by multinational corporations and other governments. The Zambian Connection: Ukrainian plane came to deliver UNITA diamonds? Monitor for Human Rights and Development, Issue 101, April 7-13 2000, also reports on the Diamond and Zambia connection.

ANGOLA: Allegations of embezzlement of ‘petrodollars’, by IRIN, the U. DRC is also involved in some of these civil wars. No less than 28 Sub-Saharan African states have been at war since 1980, as pointed out by international development organization, ID21. When the missionaries came to Africa they had the Bible and we had the land. When we opened them we had the Bible and they had the land. The freedom from imperial powers was, and is still, not a smooth transition.

The natural struggle to rebuild is proving difficult. Between 1870 and World War I alone, the European scramble for Africa resulted in the adding of around one-fifth of the land area of the globe to its overseas colonial possessions. Colonial administrations started to take hold. In some areas, Europeans were encouraged to settle, thus creating dominant minority societies. France even planned to incorporate Algeria into the French state, such was the dominance and confidence of colonial rulers at the time. In other cases, the classic divide and conquer techniques had to be used to get local people to help administer colonial administrations.

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