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This article is about the European or Digestive system of silkworm pdf American gypsy moth. For the Lymantria dispar species, see Lymantria dispar.

Lymantria dispar dispar, commonly known as the gypsy moth, European gypsy moth, or North American gypsy moth, is a moth in the family Erebidae that is of Eurasian origin. It has a range which covers Europe, Africa, and North America. Carl Linnaeus first described the species Lymantria dispar in 1758. The subject of classification has changed throughout the years, resulting in confusion surrounding the species’ taxonomy. This caused many references to describe this one species in different ways. The family has jumped between Lymantriidae, Noctuidae and Erebidae.

Lymantria dispar dispar has been designated a subspecies of Lymantria dispar. It is classified as a pest, and its larvae consume the leaves of over 500 species of trees, shrubs and plants. The gypsy moth is one of the most destructive pests of hardwood trees in the eastern United States. It is listed as one of the 100 most destructive invasive species worldwide. Linnaeus first described the species Lymantria dispar in 1758. The subject of classification has changed throughout the years, resulting in confusion surrounding the species taxonomy. Lymantriid larvae are commonly called tussock moths because of the tufts of hair on the larvae.

Lymantriidae was separated from Lariidae and was classified as its own family by Hampson in 1893. Lymantriidae was reclassified into the family Noctuidae in 2006. Noctuidae is defined as a group in which hindwing vein M2, originates in the lower third of the discal cell, but it is as strong as vein M3. This results in the cubital vein appearing to have four branches. The classification of Noctuidae came from Mitchel et al.

Lymantriidae belonged within Noctuidae, but disagree with the classification as a subfamily. Fewer taxonomic changes are required with the reclassification of Lymantriidae being a subfamily in the monophyletic group of Noctuidae. Sources published prior to the reclassification in 2006 and shortly thereafter may refer to Lymantriidae. Noctuidae has received acceptance, but is not yet universal. In 2012, Lymantriidae was moved from Noctuidae to Erebidae, further complicating the taxonomy. The newly created family has been reflected in some sources.

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