Please forward this bs 5628 part 2 pdf screen to 209. Insulite Insulite Insulite medium density lightweight aggregate blocks are manufactured in accordance with BS EN 771-3 from a mixture of furnace bottom ash and approved lightweight aggregates.

Insulite is available in Standard texture for all background block applications and closer textured ‘Premier’ finish for smoother-faced internal paint-grade applications. Walled weight is for a single-leaf wall, plastered on both sides. Sound Reduction Rw values are based on wall mass and assumes a plastered finish on both sides. The block weights quoted above are approximate and include the typical additional weight from the moisture content.

Fire resistance periods to BS 5628-3 for a single-leaf, non-loadbearing plastered wall. All blocks are suitable for use above and below d. The blocks are readily available in a design of solid, cellular and hollow configurations offering both the architect and engineer a flexible choice of design requirements with a standard face size of 440 x 215mm. Walled weight is for a single-leaf wall, plastered on both sides. Sound Reduction Rw values are based on wall mass and assumes a plastered finish on both sides. The block weights quoted above are approximate and include the typical additional weight from the moisture content. Fire resistance periods to BS 5628-3 for a single-leaf, non-loadbearing plastered wall.

Technical Lime in mortars Lime has been used as a binder in mortars for over 2000 years. Today, lime is still used as the primary binder in many mixes, usually in the form of lime putty or Hydraulic lime. Hydrated lime is used in modern cement based mortars mainly for its properties as a plasticiser. Lime, therefore, enhances the ability of the brickwork to accommodate stresses caused by building movement and cyclical changes without excessive cracking. Workability Lime improves the plasticity and workability of mortar, while providing a high degree of cohesiveness it also spreads easily under the trowel. Water retention Lime mortars have high water retention, creating an improved bond as there is more contact between unit and mortar.

Mortar strength The use of lime in mortar reduces the compressive and flexural strength of the hardened mortar. In situations where structural movement takes place, lime mortars can better accommodate this movement. Freeze-thaw resistance Not only does lime mortar reduce the risk of water ingress, vapour permeability allows any moisture to evaporate, thus reducing the risk of freeze thaw deterioration. Vapour Permeability Vapour permeability of mortar improves with increasing lime content. A high lime mortar can act as a ‘wick’, to allow water vapour to pass out from the building enabling the structure to effectively ‘breathe’.

The crystals that are subsequently formed by this process help to plug the cracks. Air Lime or high calcium lime does not have any hydraulic component. It can be quicklime for slaking or hydrated lime. CL90 Q is the purest grade of building quicklime and CL90 S is the purest grade of hydrated lime for building. Several grades of air lime are identified in EN459 the European standard for Building Lime. Several grades of Lime with Hydraulic Properties are identified in EN459-1 the European standard for Building Lime. Natural Hydraulic lime which does not contain any performance enhancing additives.

Its properties are as a result of the mineralogy of the calcium carbonate stone which is quarried for burning. Formulated Lime may contain cement or clinker, pozzolana, ground granulated blast furnace slag or other performance enhancing additives. It is blended to give the required performance characteristics. Any additions are identified by the manufacturer.

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